U.S. 1, Street Road (Route 132) Lane, Ramp Restrictions at Night Aug. 14-19 for Construction in Bensalem

Lane and ramp closures will be in place at night on U.S. 1 and at the Pennsylvania Turnpike’s Bensalem Interchange, and on Street Road (Route 132) in Bensalem Township, Bucks County, for paving, bridge painting and other construction activities, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) announced today.
 
The work schedule and locations are:

  • Sunday, August 14, through Friday, August 19, from 7:00 PM to 6:00 AM the following morning, alternating northbound and southbound lane closures will be in place on U.S. 1 between Old Lincoln Highway and the Neshaminy interchange;
  • Sunday, August 14, through Friday, August 19, from 7:00 PM to 6:00 AM the following morning, alternating eastbound and westbound lane closures will be in place on Street Road (Route 132) between Old Lincoln Highway and Kingston Way;
  • Sunday, August 14, from 7:00 PM to 6:00 AM the following morning, the ramps to and from northbound U.S. 1 and the Turnpike interchange will be closed; and
  • Monday, August 15, through Thursday, August 18, from 7:00 PM to 6:00 AM the following morning, the ramp from the Turnpike interchange to northbound U.S. 1 will be closed. 

During the ramp closures, traffic from U.S. 1 to the Turnpike will be detoured to the Neshaminy Exit to the ramp to southbound U.S. 1 back to the Turnpike. Traffic on the Turnpike ramp to northbound U.S. 1 will be detoured on southbound U.S. 1 to the Street Road (Route 132) Exit to the ramp to northbound U.S. 1.
 
Motorists also are reminded that southbound Old Lincoln Highway remains closed through mid-September from the ramp to southbound U.S. 1 to Bristol Road in Middletown Township for reconstruction. Motorists are detoured south on U.S. 1 to the Neshaminy Interchange, then right onto Rockhill Drive back to Old Lincoln Highway.
 
Drivers are advised to allow extra time when traveling through the work areas. All scheduled activities are weather dependent.
 
PennDOT is reconstructing and widening almost three miles of U.S. 1, improving the interchanges, and constructing several new bridges — including new structures over the Neshaminy Creek and over rail lines near the Penndel exit— under two contracts (RC1, RC2) to rebuild, widen and improve U.S.1 in Bucks County.
 
JD Eckman, Inc., of Atglen, PA is the general contractor on the $111.5 million Section RC2 project that is scheduled to be completed in mid-2026. Allan Myers, Inc. of Worcester, PA is the general contractor on the $95 million Section RC1 project that is expected to be completed this summer.

PennDOT to Begin Business U.S. 1 (Lincoln Highway) Intersection Improvement Project in Penndel Borough

Daytime lane closure planned next week on Business U.S. 1 approaching Hulmeville Avenue

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) announced today that construction will begin on Thursday, August 4, on a project to enhance safety and improve travel through the Business U.S. 1 (Lincoln Highway) and Hulmeville Avenue Intersection in Penndel Borough, Bucks County. 

Under this project, PennDOT’s contractor will widen the existing intersection to add exclusive left-turn lanes; mill, pave and stripe the intersection and its approaches; upgrade existing traffic signal equipment; and install new ADA curb ramps at the Business U.S. 1 (Lincoln Highway) intersections at Hulmeville Avenue and Noeland Avenue. 

Additional enhancements include replacing the existing sidewalk along the north and south side of Business U.S. 1 (Lincoln Highway) approaching the intersection with Hulmeville Avenue; adjusting the curbing to improve truck turning radius; and upgrading drainage inlets and pipes.

On Thursday, August 4, and Friday, August 5, from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM, Business U.S. 1 (Lincoln Highway) motorists will encounter a lane closure in both directions between Glen Avenue and Hulmeville Avenue for test hole operations as the first construction activities get underway.

As construction on this improvement project progresses, the contractor will implement full closures as needed on Hulmeville Avenue at Business U.S. 1 (Lincoln Highway). Lane closures on Business U.S. 1 (Lincoln Highway) will also be utilized periodically during off-peak travel times. 

Motorists are advised to allow extra time when traveling through the work area because backups and delays will occur. All scheduled activities are weather dependent.

Road-Con, Inc. of West Chester, Chester County, is the general contractor on the $2.2 million project, which is financed with 100% federal funds. Construction on the project is expected to finish in Summer 2023. 

Business U.S. 1 (Lincoln Highway) Lane Closure Penndel Borough (110966)

Construction Update: Summer 2022

Section RC1, the first of three construction projects for PennDOT’s $95 million U.S. 1 Bucks Improvement Project, will be completed this summer after nearly four years of construction to widen and improve the roadway between the Turnpike Interchange and Old Lincoln Highway. Section RC2 remains focused on the construction of new U.S. 1 bridges over the Neshaminy Creek and the Penndel/Business U.S. 1 Interchange.


RC1

Beginning in the fall of 2018, Section RC1 included improvements to U.S. 1, Street Road (Route 132), and Bristol Road, in addition to interchange improvements at the U.S. 1/Street Road Interchange and the U.S. 1/Pennsylvania Turnpike Interchange.

Under this project, U.S. 1 was reconstructed between the Street Road (Route 132) and PA Turnpike interchanges. A third travel lane was added in each direction, medians were widened to provide 12-foot-wide inside shoulders, and driveway accesses from U.S. 1 to Street Road were relocated. The road’s profile also was raised to improve vertical clearances over Street Road (Route 132), the Turnpike and its ramps.

Street Road (Route 132) also was reconstructed and widened to include turn lanes during RC1 construction. Signalized intersections and turn lanes were constructed at the relocated U.S. 1 Interchange ramps, the driveway at the Red Roof Inn was relocated, left-turn lanes were added in both directions at the Turnpike’s westbound slip ramp intersection on Street Road, and a new Southbound on-ramp from eastbound Street Road was added.

The Bristol Road Bridge also was replaced to improve vertical clearance over U.S. 1 and room for widening U.S. 1 below.

This project also included the relocation and construction of new ramps at the Street Road (Route 132) and Turnpike interchanges. 


RC2

Significant progress was made this spring on the bridges carrying U.S. 1 over the Neshaminy Creek and the Penndel/Business U.S. 1 interchange.

With support columns in place, workers placed deck beams and installed rebar on the new southbound Neshaminy Creek bridge (see below) in preparation for paving set to begin in July.

At the Penndel/Business U.S. 1 interchange, northbound bridge abutments and piers were completed and deck beams were placed in late June. The contractor expects to begin deck placement of the northbound bridge in late summer.

In addition to the bridge work, crews continue installation of the stormwater drainage system along U.S. 1 in the RC2 work area, and excavation continues along both sides of U.S. 1 to prepare for construction of a third travel lane between the Turnpike and Penndel/Business U.S. 1 interchanges.

Later this summer following completion of RC1, work will get started at the Neshaminy Exit, including replacement of the U.S.1 bridge over Rockhill Drive and improvements to the interchange.

RC2 is expected to be completed in mid-2026.

The contracts, RC1 and RC2, are part of PennDOT’s three-phase project to improve four miles of U.S.1 in Bucks County by reconstructing and widening the pavement, building several bridges, and improving several interchanges along a continuous three-mile section of highway in Bensalem and Middletown townships.

PennDOT in 2014 completed $14.8 million in improvements at the U.S. 1/Maple Avenue Interchange in Middletown Township as part of their overall initiative to modernize and upgrade the U.S. 1 corridor in Bucks County.

PennDOT Urges Caution in Work Zones 

Recent crashes put workers, motorists at risk

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) is reminding motorists to drive safely in work zones after there have been several incidents of work zone intrusions resulting in motorists hitting PennDOT employees or equipment.
 
The most recent crash occurred on June 5, 2022, when a PennDOT employee was struck by a motorist while working on a bridge resurfacing project in Allegheny County. The employee suffered injuries requiring medical attention and transportation to a hospital.
 
“Work zones may be a temporary inconvenience, but these workers all deserve to get home safely,” said PennDOT Secretary Yassmin Gramian. “Please slow down and never drive distracted, especially in work zones where roadway conditions can change every day.”
 
According to PennDOT data, in 2021 there were 1,649 work zone crashes, resulting in 16 fatalities. Additionally, since 1970, PennDOT has lost 90 workers in the line of duty.
 
In addition to crash data from police reports, PennDOT monitors work zone safety with internal reports. From January 1, 2020, to June 7, 2022, there have been 300 reported intrusions in PennDOT work zones. Of those work zone intrusions, 31 resulted in injuries to PennDOT employees, 66 caused damage to PennDOT equipment or vehicles only, and 203 did not result in injury or damage but had the potential to do so.
 
In Pennsylvania, there are two distinct programs related to active work zones. Under Title 75, Section 3326, motorists caught by police driving 11 mph or more above the posted speed limit in an active work zone, or who are involved in a crash in an active work zone and are convicted for failing to drive at a safe speed, automatically lose their license for 15 days. Additionally, fines for certain traffic violations — including speeding, driving under the influence, and failure to obey traffic devices — are doubled for active work zones. The law also provides for up to five years of additional jail time for individuals convicted of homicide by vehicle for a crash that occurred in an active work zone.
 
Under Title 75, Section 3369, fines are allowed to be administered through the Automated Work Zone Speed Enforcement (AWZSE) program. Pennsylvania’s AWZSE program, first implemented in March 2020, uses vehicle-mounted systems to detect and record motorists exceeding posted work zone speed limits by 11 miles per hour or more using electronic speed timing devices. AWZSE systems are only operational in active work zones where workers are present. Work Zones that have an AWZSE system present and active will have unique signs in advance of the enforcement area, alerting drivers to the upcoming enforcement. Registered owners receive a warning letter for a first offense, a violation notice and $75 fine for a second offense, and a violation notice and $150 fine for third and subsequent offenses. These violations are civil penalties only; no points are assessed to driver’s licenses.
 
For more information on work zone safety visit, www.PennDOT.pa.gov/Safety.
 
For more information on the Automated Work Zone Speed Enforcement program, including a list of projects where the units are deployed, visit https://workzonecameras.penndot.gov.
 
Photos and videos are available online at PAcast.com.

Federal REAL ID Enforcement Begins May 3, 2023

With the one-year countdown beginning today for the federal enforcement of REAL ID for commercial domestic air travel and other federal purposes, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) joined the Transportation Safety Administration (TSA) and Philadelphia International Airport officials to remind Pennsylvania residents who want REAL ID-compliant driver’s licenses and photo ID cards and have not yet gotten one to gather the needed documents now to ensure they leave plenty of time to get their REAL ID before the federal enforcement date.

To date, PennDOT has issued approximately 1.6 million REAL ID products.

REAL ID is a federal law that affects how states issue driver’s licenses and ID cards if they are going to be acceptable for federal purposes, such as boarding a domestic flight or entering a federal building that requires federally acceptable ID upon entry. A federally acceptable form of identification (whether it’s a Pennsylvania REAL ID driver’s license or ID card, a valid U.S. Passport/Passport Card, a military ID, etc.) must be used for these purposes on and after May 3, 2023.

There is no requirement that any resident obtain a REAL ID; PennDOT continues to offer standard-issue driver’s licenses and photo IDs.

“Although a year seems like a long time to get ready, the deadline will be upon us before you know it. We encourage our customers who want a REAL ID to get one as soon as possible,” said PennDOT Acting Executive Deputy Secretary Melissa Batula. “We continue to focus on providing the best possible customer service to all of our customers as the federal deadline approaches.”

Since March 1, 2019, PennDOT has processed about 8.3 million customers, with more than 1.6 million individuals choosing to opt into the REAL ID program. The remaining 6.7 million have chosen not to participate or use an alternative federally acceptable form of ID come the May 2023 deadline.

“We see plenty of travelers who reside in neighboring Delaware and New Jersey who fly out of Philadelphia International Airport regularly, and like all travelers from out-of-state who want to fly after May 3, 2023, they also will need to have a REAL ID compliant driver’s license or other acceptable form of ID when they approach our TSA travel document podium,” said TSA Federal Security Director Gerardo Spero. “The REAL ID law is for all Americans who want to fly out of any domestic airport across the country starting one year from now. My advice is to go to your local state’s department of motor vehicles or department of transportation to get your upgraded REAL ID driver’s license now. Don’t wait.”

Customers can obtain a REAL ID by presenting documents for verification and processing at any driver license center. Federal regulations require that to be issued a REAL ID-compliant product, PennDOT must verify the below documents:

  • Proof of Identity: Examples include original or certified copy of a birth certificate filed with the State Office of Vital Records/Statistics with a raised seal/embossed or valid, unexpired, U.S. Passport;
  • Proof of Social Security Number:  Social security card, in current legal name;
  • Two Proofs of Current, Physical PA Address: Examples include a current, unexpired PA driver’s license or identification card, vehicle registration or a utility bill with the same name and address; and 
  • Proof of all Legal Name Changes (if current legal name is different than what is reflected on proof of identity document): Examples include a certified marriage certificate(s) issued by the County Court for each marriage, court order(s) approving a change in legal name or amended birth certificate issued by the State Office of Vital Records/Statistics. If current name is the same as what is reflected on proof of identity document (usually birth certificate or passport), a customer does not need to show proof of legal name changes.

Customers have three options for obtaining a REAL ID product: Customers may order their REAL ID online if they have been pre-verified and their REAL ID product will be mailed to them within 15 business days; they can visit any PennDOT driver license center that is open for driver license services, have their documents verified and imaged, and their REAL ID product will be mailed to them within 15 business days; or they can visit one of 13 REAL ID Centers and receive their REAL ID product over the counter at the time of service.

For a full list of driver license centers and their services, please visit the PennDOT Driver and Vehicle Services website, www.dmv.pa.gov.

When a customer gets their first REAL ID product, they pay a one-time fee of $30, plus the applicable renewal fee (current renewal fee is $30.50 for a four-year non-commercial driver’s license, and $31.50 for a photo ID). The expiration date of their initial REAL ID product will include any time remaining on their existing non-REAL ID product, plus an additional four years, unless the customer is over 65 and has a two-year license. This expiration date structure means that customers won’t “lose” time that they’ve already paid for. After the initial REAL ID product expires, customers pay no additional fee, beyond regular renewal fees, to renew a REAL ID product.

REAL ID-compliant products are marked with a gold star in the upper right corner, standard-issue (non-compliant) products include the phrase “NOT FOR REAL ID PURPOSES,” per federal regulations. Sample images can be viewed on PennDOT’s website.

More information about REAL ID in Pennsylvania, including frequently asked questions and information on documents required for REAL ID, can be found at www.penndot.gov/REALID.

Construction Update: Spring 2022

Three Bridges Completed, Two Under Construction on U.S. 1

Construction crews made significant progress on new bridges over the past winter, finishing the southbound bridge over the Turnpike ramps, completing much of the abutment and pier construction for the new southbound U.S. 1 bridge over the Neshaminy Creek, and beginning abutment and pier construction for the new northbound U.S. 1 bridge at the Penndel/Business U.S. 1 exit.

The bridge work and other construction is being done under two PennDOT projects (RC1, RC2) currently underway to improve U.S. 1 in Bucks County.


RC2 Bridge Progress

Crews are putting the finishing touches on the supports for the new southbound U.S. 1 bridge over the Neshaminy Creek (see below), and preparing to set deck beams and begin deck construction later this spring. PennDOT’s contractor will finish the southbound structure this summer.

As work continues on the creek bridge, construction continues on two abutments and three piers for the new northbound U.S. 1 bridge over the rail lines and ramps at the Penndel/Business U.S. 1 interchange this spring. Installation of deck beams is expected this summer.

On U.S. 1 between the Turnpike Interchange and the Bristol Road overpass, the contractor will work this spring to prepare the median to carry traffic during upcoming traffic pattern shifts around the bridge work areas.

In addition, southbound embankment excavation has finished, and installation of the project’s stormwater drainage system is underway there. Northbound embankment excavation continues, with drainage work to follow. Embankments along both sides of U.S. 1 are being excavated for construction of a third travel lane in each direction from just north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike’s Bensalem Interchange to the Penndel/Business U.S. 1 Interchange.

At the Neshaminy Interchange, the contractor will shift traffic away from the Rockhill Drive median area and begin work to add a center pier for the new U.S. 1 overpass following completion of utility work later this spring.

The $110.9 million RC2 project is scheduled to be completed in mid-2026.


RC1 Heading for Completion this Summer

With completion over the winter of the southbound side of the U.S. 1 bridge over the Turnpike ramps, new RC1 bridges are now in place over the Turnpike ramps, the Turnpike, and Street Road (Route 132).

Southbound U.S. 1 paving between Street Road (Route 132) and the commercial area approaching Old Lincoln Highway will be finished this spring, wrapping up major work on U.S. 1.

Reconstruction of the westbound side of Street Road through the U.S. 1 Interchange area continues until later this spring. The contractor will next install a permanent median barrier, then open the new ramp from Street Road to southbound U.S. 1 this summer to complete the work on the busy roadway.

As has been the case throughout construction, access to and from properties located on both sides of U.S. 1 will continue to be maintained until the $94 million RC1 project comes to a close in mid-2022. 

The contracts, RC1 and RC2, are part of PennDOT’s three-phase project to improve four miles of U.S. 1 in Bucks County by reconstructing and widening the pavement, building several bridges, and improving several interchanges along a continuous three-mile section of highway in Bensalem and Middletown townships.

PennDOT in 2014 completed $14.8 million in improvements at the U.S. 1/Maple Avenue Interchange in Middletown Township (see above) as part of their overall initiative to modernize and upgrade the U.S. 1 corridor in Bucks County.

Construction Update: Winter 2021-22

U.S. 1 Bridge Construction Continues, Southbound U.S. 1 Paving Continues South of the Turnpike

Abutment and pier construction continue for the new U.S. 1 bridge over the Neshaminy Creek while abutment construction has started for the new U.S. 1 bridge over rail lines and the Penndel/U.S. 1 Business exit under one-of-two PennDOT projects currently underway to improve U.S. 1 in Bucks County.

RC2

Construction is underway through early 2022 on the north and south abutments and two in-stream piers for the new southbound bridge over the Neshaminy Creek (see below). Bridge beam setting and deck construction will then continue through winter as conditions permit, with placement of the concrete deck this spring and construction of the bridge finishing in early summer.

On U.S. 1 between the Turnpike Interchange and the Bristol Road overpass, the contractor continues to excavate the embankments along both sides of U.S. 1 for the construction of a third travel lane in each direction from just north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike’s Bensalem Interchange to the Penndel/U.S. 1 Business Interchange. Installation of drainage components will get underway in early 2022 along the southbound side of U.S. 1.

North of the Neshaminy Creek, the northbound ramp to U.S. 1 Business has been widened and construction has started on abutments and piers for the northbound structure over the Penndel Interchange and adjacent rail lines (see right), the project’s second set of large bridges. The new northbound structure is expected to be built by fall 2022.

At the Neshaminy Interchange, the contractor will continue drainage work and grading this winter in advance of construction to reconfigure and improve the interchange during a later stage of the project

The $110.9 million RC2 project is scheduled to be completed in mid-2026.

RC1

New southbound bridges are in place over the Turnpike and Street Road (Route 132), while the new southbound bridge over Turnpike’s ramps remains under construction (see below). The contractor will install parapets and tie-ins to the U.S. 1 bridge as conditions permit this winter. 

As construction continues on the final southbound bridge, southbound U.S. 1 paving between Street Road (Route 132) and the commercial area approaching Old Lincoln Highway will be finished over the winter if conditions permit.

The new southbound U.S. 1 ramp to Street Road (Route 132) has been completed and is now open (see below). After construction in the middle portion of Street Road wrapped up in late 2021, reconstruction of the westbound side of Street Road got underway. The new ramp from Street Road to southbound U.S. 1 will remain under construction until westbound widening on Street Road finishes in the spring. Eastbound Street Road reconstruction between Kingston Way and Old Lincoln Highway finished earlier in 2021. 

Access to and from properties located on both sides of U.S. 1 will continue to be maintained during construction.

Construction on the $94 million RC1 project will continue into mid-2022. 

The contracts, RC1 and RC2, are part of PennDOT’s three-phase project to improve four miles of U.S. 1 in Bucks County by reconstructing and widening the pavement, building several bridges, and improving several interchanges along a continuous three-mile section of highway in Bensalem and Middletown townships.

PennDOT in 2014 completed $14.8 million in improvements at the U.S. 1/Maple Avenue Interchange in Middletown Township as part of their overall initiative to modernize and upgrade the U.S. 1 corridor in Bucks County.

Wolf Administration Highlights Productive 2021 Design, Construction Season Across Southeast Pennsylvania

More than 190 construction projects underway worth more than $2.2 billion

King of Prussia, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) Engineering District 6 is wrapping up an aggressive 2021 design and construction season that included 62 new contracts worth more than $540 million aimed at repairing and improving state highways and bridges across Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia counties.

“We are pleased with the investments we were able to make into our roadways and bridges this year,” said Acting District 6 Executive Louis Belmonte. “We had several high-profile improvement projects that were completed or began in 2021, all with the goal of providing safe and efficient transportation for all modes of travel across southeast Pennsylvania.”

District 6 currently has more than 190 projects under construction valued at over $2.2 billion. Some of the most notable projects that were completed this year include:

  • U.S. 422 Bridge Replacements – $98.3 million project that built new, wider bridges to improve travel and carry U.S. 422 motorists over the Schuylkill River, Norfolk Southern Railroad, South Trooper Road and Schuylkill River Trail in West Norriton, Upper Merion and Lower Providence townships, Montgomery County;
  • Interstate 95 Section BS4 – $80.9 million project that enhanced traffic flow and surface street access to I-95 and the Betsy Ross Bridge Interchange by widening and improving a section of Aramingo Avenue, building several new ramps, and extending Adams Avenue in the Frankford section of Philadelphia;
  • Interstate 76 Viaduct Rehabilitation – $47.1 million contract that rehabilitated and resurfaced the I-76 (Schuylkill Expressway) viaduct in Center City Philadelphia and repaired the three-span bridge over Route 23 (Conshohocken State Road) and several other I-76 structures in Montgomery County;
  • Route 452 (Market Street Bridge) Replacement – $21.5 million project that replaced the bridge carrying Route 452 (Market Street) over Amtrak and SEPTA railroad tracks in Marcus Hook Borough and Lower Chichester Township, Delaware County; and
  • Grays Ferry Bridge Rehabilitation – $15.3 million project that repaired and improved the bridge carrying Grays Ferry Avenue over the Schuylkill River, Amtrak/SEPTA and CSX railway tracks in Philadelphia.

Some of the most notable projects that began this year include:

  • U.S. 1 Section RC2 – $96.6 million project to widen and improve a 1.5-mile section of the highway in Bensalem and Middletown townships, Bucks County;
  • U.S. 202 (Dekalb Pike) Section 61S – $54.3 million project to improve, widen and reconstruct approximately 1.8 miles of U.S. 202 (Dekalb Pike) from Johnson Highway to Township Line Road in Norristown, and East Norriton and Whitpain townships, Montgomery County;
  • Interstate 95 Section AF2 – $31.7 million project to reconstruct sections of Delaware, Allegheny and Castor avenues in Philadelphia to improve traffic movement on surface streets at the I-95 Allegheny Avenue/Castor Avenue Interchange;
  • U.S. 1 Pavement Preservation – $13.7 million project to repair and resurface approximately six miles of U.S. 1 (Baltimore Pike) in Chadds Ford and Concord townships, Delaware County and Pennsbury Township, Chester County; and
  • County Line Road Improvement – $11 million project to reconstruct and improve a three-mile section of County Line Road in Warrington Township, Bucks County and Horsham Township, Montgomery County.

“We pride ourselves on taking an aggressive approach with our construction program in an effort to move crucial projects forward to enhance, reinforce and maintain our extensive transportation network,” Assistant District 6 Executive for Construction Harold Windisch said.

PennDOT owns and maintains more than 2,800 state bridges across the region, 345 of which are currently listed in poor condition. In 2021, District 6 was able to repair or replace 14 state bridges.

“It is crucial that we continue to deliver road and bridge projects from design to construction to significantly reduce the backlog of our pavement and bridge demands across the region,” PennDOT Assistant District 6 Executive for Design Chuck Davies said.

Across District 6, more than 124 miles of state highway were resurfaced in 2021.

The pothole season was extremely active for District 6 maintenance forces following a severe 2020-21 winter season. PennDOT maintenance crews across the region used more than 30,000 tons of asphalt to patch potholes and performed crack sealing operations on 336 miles of state highway to repair pavement.

“Maintaining our transportation system is paramount to extending the life of our highways and bridges, PennDOT Assistant District 6 Executive for Maintenance John Krafczyk said. “The longer life equates to money saved by deferring the need for major rehabilitation and replacement projects.”

District 6 responded to more than 6,000 pothole inquiries through PennDOT’s Customer Care Center in 2021, a 120 percent increase from the previous year.

District 6 continues to manage the challenges from the flood damage caused by Tropical Storm Ida in early September. PennDOT staff are working aggressively to make the necessary repairs under current contracts or program new projects to safely reopen damaged bridges and highways to travelers. Most of the repair work is complete or underway, however, there are several state bridges and highways that remain closed across the region due to various storm-related damage.

For a complete list of storm damage closures or construction projects impacting state-owned highways in Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia counties, visit the District 6 Traffic Bulletin.

Information about infrastructure in District 6 including completed work and significant projects, is available at www.penndot.gov/D6Results. Find PennDOT’s planned and active construction projects at www.projects.penndot.gov

Construction Update: Fall 2021

New U.S. 1 Neshaminy Creek Bridge Construction, Southbound U.S. 1 Paving South of the Turnpike

Excavation and bridge construction mark the progress of work to widen and improve U.S. 1 north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike as paving on the southbound side of U.S. 1 from Old Lincoln Highway to the Turnpike underway this fall.

The contracts, RC1 and RC2, are part of PennDOT’s three-phase project to improve four miles of U.S. 1 in Bucks County by reconstructing and widening the pavement, building several bridges, and improving several interchanges along a continuous three-mile section of highway in Bensalem and Middletown townships.


RC1

New southbound bridges are in place over the Turnpike (see below) and Street Road (Route 132) while the new southbound bridge over Turnpike’s ramps remains under construction through early 2022.

As construction continues on the final southbound bridge, southbound paving between Street Road (Route 132) and the commercial area approaching Old Lincoln Highway is expected to be completed by the end of the year.

The new southbound U.S. 1 ramp to Street Road (Route 132) has been completed and is now open (see right). The new ramp from Street Road to southbound U.S. 1 remains under construction until next spring.

On Street Road (Route 132), eastbound reconstruction between Kingston Way and Old Lincoln Highway has finished. When median construction wraps up later this year, eastbound and westbound traffic will be shifted onto the new eastbound and median pavement. Westbound reconstruction will follow and continue through next spring as conditions permit.

Access to and from properties located on both sides of U.S. 1 will continue to be maintained during construction.

Construction on the $94 million RC1 project will continue into mid-2022. 


RC2

Construction is underway through the end of the year on the north and south abutments and two in-stream piers for the new southbound bridge over the Neshaminy Creek. Beam placement and deck construction will begin in early winter and continue through early 2022 as conditions permit.

Also this fall, excavation will continue behind temporary barriers along both sides of U.S. 1 north of the Turnpike Interchange for the construction of retaining walls and embankments that will support construction of a third travel lane, along with an auxiliary lane, in each direction from just north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike’s Bensalem Interchange to the Penndel/U.S. 1 Business Interchange. 

Abutment construction has started on the northbound structure over the Penndel Interchange and adjacent rail lines, the project’s second set of large bridges. Work on the northbound structure will continue in coordination with utility relocations.

Excavation to widen the northbound off-ramp and southbound on-ramp from Business 1/Penndel also is underway.

Utility relocation work will occur periodically at the Neshaminy Interchange, which will be reconfigured and improved during a later stage of the project.  Improvements to the interchanges will meet current design standards for ramps and acceleration/deceleration lanes.

The $110.9 million RC2 project is scheduled to be completed in mid-2026.

PennDOT in 2014 completed $14.8 million in improvements at the U.S. 1/Maple Avenue Interchange in Middletown Township as part of their overall initiative to modernize and upgrade the U.S. 1 corridor in Bucks County.

Construction Update: Summer 2021

U.S. 1 Under Construction for Three Miles in Bucks County

Construction continues this summer in Lower Bucks County on two adjacent contracts to improve U.S. 1 by reconstructing and widening the pavement, building several bridges, and improving several interchanges along a continuous three-mile section of highway in Bensalem and Middletown townships.

The contracts, RC1 and RC2, are part of PennDOT’s three-phase project to improve four miles of U.S. 1 in Bucks County.


RC1

Reconstruction of the southbound side of U.S. 1 from Old Lincoln Highway to north of the Turnpike continues to progress this summer, highlighted by construction on bridges over the Pennsylvania Turnpike, the Turnpike ramps, and Street Road (Route 132).

Deck construction is underway on the northbound side of the new bridges over the Turnpike and Street Road (Route 132). Placement of the new concrete decks on both new spans is expected in late summer. Abutment construction will continue through the summer on the new northbound bridge over Turnpike ramps with deck construction in the fall.

As bridge construction continues, subsurface utilities and parts of the stormwater drainage system also are being installed along the southbound side of the U.S. 1 roadway, and sound walls are being installed along the southbound side between Street Road (Route 132) and the commercial area approaching Old Lincoln Highway.

The new southbound U.S. 1 ramps to and from Street Road (Route 132) remain closed, except for the ramp from U.S. 1 that is temporarily being used to connect to eastbound and westbound Street Road.

On Street Road (Route 132), eastbound reconstruction continues in coordination with construction of the southbound side of the U.S. 1 overpass. 

Access to and from properties located on both sides of U.S. 1 will continue to be maintained during construction.

Construction on the $94 million RC1 project will continue into mid-2022. 


RC2

Excavation continues behind concrete barriers along both sides of U.S. 1 north of the Turnpike Interchange for the construction of retaining walls and embankments. The walls and embankments will support construction of a third travel lane, along with an auxiliary lane, in each direction from just north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike’s Bensalem Interchange through the Penndel/Business U.S. 1  Interchange.

Foundations for abutments and piers for the new southbound bridge over the Neshaminy Creek are under construction (see above). Once foundations are in place, crews will begin the methodical work of building the supports for the new structure.

Work on the project’s second set of large bridges, which will replace the bridges over the Penndel Interchange and adjacent rail lines, will begin later this year after the existing utility lines are relocated.

Excavation to widen the northbound off-ramp and southbound on-ramp from Business U.S. 1/Penndel also is underway (see right). Construction to reconfigure and improve the Neshaminy Interchange will be done during a later stage of the project. Improvements to the interchanges will meet current design standards for ramps and acceleration/deceleration lanes.

The $110.9 million RC2 project is scheduled to be completed in mid-2026.

PennDOT in 2014 completed $14.8 million in improvements at the U.S. 1/Maple Avenue Interchange in Middletown Township as part of their overall initiative to modernize and upgrade the U.S. 1 corridor in Bucks County.